Looking for Kipas

A portrait of my maternal grandfather drawn from my childhood memories. This is a companion piece to Remembering Por-Por

 

My grandfather ate grass.

When I think of Kong-Kong, I see him crouched in our garden, patiently tugging at the slim strands of green growing out of a corner of the lawn, the blinding sun reflecting off his white t-shirt. That evening, a plate of green-flecked omelette appeared at the dinner table. As my brothers and I prepared to attack it, Mum stopped us. That’s not for you, she said, it’s for Kong-Kong.

Growing up we saw my grandfather often, especially after Por-Por passed away. We would visit him in Penang during the school holidays, bringing chaos and chatter to 58 King Street, the Straits Settlement shophouse where he lived upstairs and ran his business downstairs, turning pieces of gold into jewellery.

He also came down to Kuala Lumpur to see us. We would return from school to find the house filled with the smoky deep spice of his cigar and the sweet-salty scent of the tau sar pneah he’d brought us from Penang’s famous Gee Hiang bakery. But before we could look for the sticky molasses and roasted green bean pastries, Mum would send us to the spare room with an order: Go and say hello to Kong-Kong first. We would crane our necks to look at him as he towered over us, and we would stare at the prickly grey stubbles on his chin, the pair of black-rimmed glasses sitting on his nose. A small smile would appear on his craggy face as he acknowledged our greeting with a nod and a grunt. Duty done, we’d run to the kitchen for our treats.

Whenever Kong-Kong came to stay, we would hear the musical lilt of Taishanese, the Southern Chinese dialect that Mum used only with her parents and siblings. My brothers and I understood very little of the language, and could only say at dinner time: Kong-Kong hiak fan – Grandfather, eat rice – as a sign of respect before we could start on our own meal.

If Mum wasn’t around, we communicated with our grandfather using a mishmash of Malay, English and Cantonese, the Chinese vernacular more commonly spoken in Kuala Lumpur. This usually worked, except for the time when Kong-Kong asked us – my brothers and our cousins Lin and Lee – to bring him a kipas.

“No,” he said, shaking his head at us as we stood, sweaty and breathless from carrying the heavy electric desk fan down the stairs for him.

Kipas,” he told us, making a flapping gesture with his right hand. We looked at him blankly. He walked out of the room muttering to himself in Taishanese – no doubt about the questionable intelligence of his familiar yet so foreign grandchildren – and returned a few minutes later with a hand fan made out of straw.

Kipas,” he gently waved it in front of our laughing faces, cooling us in the tropical heat.

Mostly, Kong-Kong sat silently with his right leg crossed over his left thigh, leaning back against his chair and fanning himself as he watched us play. Like most Chinese men of his generation, my grandfather was not very demonstrative; no hugs or kisses from Kong-Kong. He often looked stern, but we were never intimidated by his gruffness. In the rare moments that we made Kong-Kong laugh, his impassive face would be transformed by a wide smile that revealed gaps where teeth once resided. His bright eyes would crinkle, his large hands gentle as he lifted up my baby brother. He’d buy me ice-cream to make up for being left behind when the rest of you went out, my brother recalls.

My grandfather didn’t actually eat grass. Later that night, Mum told us what was in that omelette; a medicinal herb Kong-Kong used to take in China, which he’d found growing in the corner of our garden. I’m still glad I didn’t try it.

 

Photo by Amirhossein Abdollahi on Unsplash